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Presidential, senate races top Nov. 8 ballot

LOS ANGELES — Possibly the most bitterly caustic presidential campaign in U.S. history will be decided Nov. 8 when voters go to the polls to choose between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump.

State Attorney General Kamala Harris is trying to become the second African-American woman to serve in the U.S. Senate as she faces Democratic rival Loretta Sanchez, an Orange County congresswoman.

Those are the top two races on the ballot that also includes 17 state propositions, two county ballot measures and four Los Angeles City ballot measures.

In the Senate race, Harris ran first among a slate of 34 candidates in the June primary seeking to replace Sen. Barbara Boxer, who announced last year she would not seek re-election.

Harris captured 40.3 percent of the vote statewide, while Sanchez received 18.5 percent of the vote. It is the first time Democrats will face each other in November in a U.S. Senate race under the state’s top-two primary rules that pit the top two vote-getters in the primary election against each other in the November general election no matter their party affiliation.

It will be the first time Republicans will not have a candidate for U.S. Senate on the ballot since the 17th Amendment to the Constitution was approved in 1913, calling for the popular election of senators instead of allowing state legislatures to appoint them.

In other races, Rep. Janice Hahn, D-San Pedro; and Steve Napolitano, an aide to county Supervisor Don Knabe, will square off for the seat on the county Board of Supervisors being vacated by Knabe, who is forced out by term limits.

Knabe’s Fourth District is a U-shaped district that extends from the South Bay through Long Beach and into Southeast Los Angeles County. It extends east to Whittier and Diamond Bar.

The Fifth Supervisorial District also is up for grabs because of term limits.

In that race, Kathryn Barger, chief assistant to Supervisor Mike Antonovich, will face Darrell Park, a budget specialist from Pasadena.

In area congressional races, Rep. Judy Chu, D-Pasadena, will face Republican Jack Orswell, a businessman from Monrovia, in the 27th District.

Rep. Xavier Becerra, D-Los Angeles, will face Democrat Adrienne N. Edwards, a housing counselor from Los Angeles, in the 34th District.

Rep. Linda Sanchez, D-Cerritos, 45.7 percent; will face Republican Ryan Downing, an evangelical from Whittier, in the 38th District.

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Commerce, will face student Roman G. Gonzalez of Downey, who lists no party preference, in the 34th District.

In the 44th Congressional District, Democratic state Sen. Isadore Hall will face Nanette Diaz Barragan, an attorney from San Pedro, to replace Hahn.

In area Assembly races, incumbent Miguel Santiago, D-Los Angeles, will face Sandra Mendoza, a community advocate from Los Angeles, in the 53rd District.

Incumbent Ian Calderon, D-Industry, will face Republican Rita Topilian of Whittier in the 57th District, in a rematch of the 2014 election.

Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, D-South Gate, faces Republican Adams J. Miller of Lakewood, a documentary producer, received in the 63rd District.

Four area lawmakers were unchallenged in the primary and will keep their offices.

They are Assemblyman Ed Chu, D-South Pasadena, in the 49th District; Assemblyman Jimmy Gomez, D-Los Angeles in the 51st District; Assemblywoman Cristina Garcia, D-Downey, in the 58th District; state Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Long Beach in the 33rd Senate District.

Several area communities have ballot measures regarding school bonds or other issues.

In the Alhambra Unified School District, covering Alhambra, part of Monterey Park and San Gabriel, Measure AE would authorize the district to issue $110 million in bonds to repair and upgrade elementary schools and attract and retain teachers and Measure HS would authorize the district to issue $149 million in bonds to repair and upgrade high schools and attract and retain teachers.

Both measures require 55 percent of the vote for approval.

In the city of Bellflower, Measure D would mandate that city council members be elected by districts instead of at large and Measure W would approve the sale of the Bellflower Municipal Water
System to California-American Water Company.

In the city of Downey, Measure S would raise the sales tax by one half of one percent for 20 years to fund a host of city services including police, fire and paramedics after-school and senior programs and street repairs.

In the East Whittier School District, Measure R would authorize the district to issue $70 million in bonds to upgrade aging schools and Measure Z would authorize the district to issue $24 million in bonds to modernize classrooms, labs and computer systems.

Both measures require 55 percent of the vote for approval.

In the El Rancho Unified School District serving most of Pico Rivera, Measure ER would authorize the district to issue $200 million in bonds to upgrade schools, which requires 55 percent of the vote for approval.

Measure RR would establish an annual $99 parcel tax for nine years, exempting seniors and people with disabilities, to improve schools and raise teacher salaries. That measure requires two-thirds of the vote for approval.

In the city of Lynwood, Measure PS would establish a one-cent sales tax for 10 years to fund city services and Measure RD would establish a rainy day fund into which 10 percent of 2016 authorized tax revenues shall be deposited and spent only in cases of financial hardship.

In the Lynwood Unified School District, Measure N would authorize the district to issue $65 million in bonds to repair and upgrade classrooms and other school facilities. The measure requires 55 percent of the vote for approval.

In the Paramount Unified School District, Measure I would authorize the district to issue $106 million in bonds to repair and upgrade classrooms and other school facilities. The measure requires 55 percent of the vote for approval.

In the South Whittier School District, Measure QS would authorize the district to issue $29 million in bonds to repair and upgrade classrooms and other school facilities. The measure requires 55 percent of the vote for approval.

There also are two county measures on the ballot, Measure A and Measure M.

Measure A would add a tax of 1.5 cents per square foot of improved property to replace expiring funding for parks and playgrounds, anti-gang efforts, senior and recreation centers, safe drinking water, protection for beaches and rivers and preserving natural areas and open spaces.

Measure M would add a half-cent sales tax and continue an existing half-cent traffic relief tax until voters decide to end it, to fund a variety of traffic upkeep and improvement projects including expanding rail/subway/bus systems, street repairs and earthquake retrofitting.

Both measures require two-thirds of the vote for approval.

Voters can vote early at six locations around Los Angeles County.

The county Registrar of Voters office in Norwalk offers early voting Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

More than 7,700 voters cast ballots during the first weekend of early voting Oct. 29 and 30.

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day.

Polling places are listed on the back of the sample ballot registered voters received in the mail. They also can be found by visiting www.lavote.net or calling (800) 815-2666.